PFAS

New study shows how much people are willing to remove PFAS – WMUR

LASTS IN YOUR FORECAST. COMING UP. THANK YOU. MATT, A NEW STUDY FROM UNH SAYS THAT CONSUMERS ARE WILLING TO PAY FOR WATER TREATMENT TO HELP REMOVE PFAS CHEMICALS, BUT NOT ENOUGH FOR A SYSTEM WIDE SOLUTION. THE STUDY SAYS THAT THE AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD IS WILLING TO PAY AROUND $156 ANNUALLY TO PROTECT THEMSELVES FROM THE SO-CALLED FOREVER CHEMICALS. THAT’S NOT ENOUGH FOR MUNICIPAL LEVEL TREATMENT, BUT COULD BE ENOUGH FOR SOME HOUSEHOLD LEVEL WATER TREATMENT THAT COULD COME FROM AN UNDER THE SINK REVERSE OSMOSIS FILTER, WHICH RESEARCHER

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New study shows how much consumers are willing to pay to treat water to remove PFAS

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of New Hampshire shows consumers may be willing to pay for additional water treatment to reduce PFAS chemicals in water.According to a study published by the Journal of Water Resource Planning and Management, households on public water systems are willing to pay an average of $156.84 annually to help protect themselves from PFAS.Researchers said this would not cover municipal-level treatment costs but may be enough for household-level solutions, including under-the-sink reverse osmosis filters. Researchers also said, with upkeep costs, those filters cost an estimated $100 per year. The study also found that respondents who were younger, female, had children, or said they were concerned about tap water safety were more willing to pay for water treatment to remove PFAS.

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of New Hampshire shows consumers may be willing to pay for additional water treatment to reduce PFAS chemicals in water.

According to a study published by the Journal of Water Resource Planning and Management, households on public water systems are willing to pay an average of $156.84 annually to help protect themselves from PFAS.

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Researchers said this would not cover municipal-level treatment costs but may be enough for household-level solutions, including under-the-sink reverse osmosis filters. Researchers also said, with upkeep costs, those filters cost an estimated $100 per year.

The study also found that respondents who were younger, female, had children, or said they were concerned about tap water safety were more willing to pay for water treatment to remove PFAS.